Busses and Tractors to Receive 3D-Printed Spare Parts

Engineering.com | March 08, 2019

Busses and Tractors to Receive 3D-Printed Spare Parts
One application primed for disruption by 3D printing technology is the production of spare parts. After all, why house a warehouse full of odd components for just the right moment when you or a customer will need one?
This is especially true for large, unique systems and equipment, where mass production of individual specialty pieces is that much rarer. London and Amsterdam-based CNH Industrial has picked up on this insight and has begun fabricating spare parts for its industrial equipment.
A subsidiary of the Agnelli family-owned Exor investment company, CNH is one of the world’s largest capital goods businesses, making a wide variety of equipment for a range of industries, including: agriculture, construction, industry, marine and civil society.

Spotlight

In this video, John Walker, business development manager at EOS North America, explains the opportunities for metal 3D printing in manufacturing.

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Spotlight

In this video, John Walker, business development manager at EOS North America, explains the opportunities for metal 3D printing in manufacturing.