4 Ways RPA Is Changing Modern Manufacturing

KATE MCDANIEL| November 05, 2019
4 WAYS RPA IS CHANGING MODERN MANUFACTURING
Changes to the world of modern manufacturing are elevating industry leaders and leaving incumbents behind. Today's smart factory is outfitted with technologies such as 3D printing and Internet of Things - compatible machinery. The systems within these revolutionary operations let companies process orders, manufacture products, and ship to customers faster. Through them, leaders can improve the health of core processes in real time and let customers track orders at each stage of fulfillment.

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Nedschroef

Nedschroef is a leading engineering and manufacturing partner in forming technologies with over 125 years of experience. Our worldwide activities vary from design and prototyping to trading, production and logistics, to help our customers fulfil their current and future needs. Our capabilities allow us to work with both established and new companies of any size in manufacturing industries including automotive, racing, aviation and construction.

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Technologies to Adopt Now to Enable the Smart Warehouse Concept

Article | December 8, 2021

Why should warehouses be left behind as everything gets smarter in the manufacturing world? The future warehouse will be smarter and more innovative to speed up supply chain management procedures and assist businesses in intelligently segregating their raw materials and manufactured goods. So, what does it mean to have "a smart warehouse"? A smart warehouse is a big infrastructure that stores raw materials and manufactured goods and employs machines and computers to handle routine warehouse tasks that humans previously performed. Smart warehouses are inspired by smart factories and operate in a data-driven environment. It is the ability of the system in the warehouse to make it more efficient and productive by utilizing networked, automated technology. “I advocate business leaders get to know more about what AI can do and then leverage AI in proofs of concept.” – Michael Walton, Director, Industry Executive (Manufacturing) at Microsoft According to EASYECOM, nine out of ten businesses intend to include commercial service robots into their operations in some form. By 2025, it is projected that there will be roughly 23,000 robotic warehouses in the United States alone, up from only 2,500 in 2018. Furthermore, the global smart warehousing market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 11.5 percent from USD 14.8 billion in 2021 to USD 25.4 billion in 2026, according to GlobeNewswire. As can be seen, the current warehouse automation trends are scaling up the worldwide market for smart warehouses, and the value of the smart warehouse business has a long way to go in the future. So, what are the technologies that are changing traditional warehouses into intelligent warehouses? Continue reading this article to get a better understanding of this. Top 5 Warehouse Technologies to Take On Numerous manufacturing and non-manufacturing organizations, including IKEA, NIKE, and WALMART, utilize smart warehouses to streamline their overall operations. The technologies listed below assist many of them in implementing the modern warehousing idea. A Warehouse Management System Warehouse Management Systems, or WMSs, are comprehensive software systems that consolidate all of your critical data onto a single platform that can be easily accessed by team members and selected supply chain partners. This data compartmentalization allows for lightning-fast reporting, which allows for super-efficient planning, even for unexpected events. Overall, the use of warehouse management systems complements the use of other automated aspects perfectly. Automated Picking Tools The days of error-prone picking are long gone; now, when picking automation elements are integrated into the flow, warehouses can profit from near-perfect picking rates. In addition, picking procedures can be aided by various techniques, including voice-automated order picking, pick-to-light, and robotic order picking. These technologies also use cutting-edge barcoding choices that easily interface with your selected management software to provide the quickest and most accurate automated reporting experiences. Automated Guided Vehicles (AGVs) AGVs, or automatic guided vehicles, are the best approach to speeding up storage and retrieval processes. AGVs are becoming more robust as technology advances, but older models have proven safer and more cost-effective than manual labor. Their functions include pallet, rack, and other container storage and controlling and automating the entire receiving process. Platforms for Automated Inventory Control Automated inventory control platforms, when combined with a few other technological cornerstones, such as asset and inventory tags, may eliminate labor, guesswork, and unnecessary time from traditional inventory control. In addition, there are several advantages to using these platforms, including their ability to automatically count inventories and synthesize data for real-time reporting that can be viewed remotely. IoT Implementation The Internet of Things (IoT) is used by some of the world's most efficient smart warehouses, such as Amazon, as an entire concept rather than a specific technology. All of your automated and manual operations may be optimized when IoT is used to control all of your moving parts, both automated and manual. This innovative technology helps optimize a warehouse's inventory control systems, workforce planning, and, of course, the overall customer experience. While implementing technology improves the notion of a smart warehouse, it isn't always possible for every warehouse to do so instantly, especially since implementing technology takes significant financial and infrastructure changes. That's why warehouses are adopting the concept of collaborative robots (cobots). These are the autonomous elements that work with existing human workers. Cobots allow warehouses to preserve many of their existing procedures and infrastructure while gaining the benefits of fully autonomous elements. Amazon's Smart Warehouses Integrates Humans and Robots Amazon acquired Kiva Systems for $775 million in 2012, highlighting its interest in warehouse robotics. Kiva Systems was the sole known producer of warehouse robots, serving many different logistics organizations. Amazon bought Kiva Systems' machines, constructed and used them all. Amazon Robotics is a new business unit that the company has developed. Amazon recently established a semi-automated warehouse with human workers and robots. As a result, simple chores like moving parcels and scanning barcodes are automated. However, organizing goods and carrying complex objects (like bottles) is still part of human work. Amazon's automated warehouse employs over 400 robots and hundreds of human employees. Amazon's rise in two crucial areas – online shopping and logistics – has been accelerated by warehouse robots. Final Words Modern warehousing is a new trend in the manufacturing industry that automates numerous procedures required for keeping manufacturing materials and products organized. Technology trends in warehousing are making manufacturers' jobs easier and promoting the future warehouse model in 2022. Implement the cutting-edge technology outlined above to stay current with warehousing trends and boost productivity, efficiency, accuracy, and flexibility for your personnel and their operations. FAQ What are the key benefits of a smart warehouse? A smart warehouse improves the warehouse's productivity, efficiency, and accuracy. It also allows personnel and procedures to be flexible. What exactly is WMS? A warehouse management system (WMS) is a software solution that handles the supply chain from the distribution center to the retail shelf. What is COBOT? Cobots are designed to work with people rather than replace them. Cobots are also known as people-focused robots. They can help humans simplify and improve their work. { "@context": "https://schema.org", "@type": "FAQPage", "mainEntity": [{ "@type": "Question", "name": "What are the key benefits of a smart warehouse?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "A smart warehouse improves the warehouse's productivity, efficiency, and accuracy. It also allows personnel and procedures to be flexible." } },{ "@type": "Question", "name": "What exactly is WMS?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "A warehouse management system (WMS) is a software solution that handles the supply chain from the distribution center to the retail shelf." } },{ "@type": "Question", "name": "What is COBOT?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "Cobots are designed to work with people rather than replace them. Cobots are also known as people-focused robots. They can help humans simplify and improve their work." } }] }

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Scaling, Optimizing & Pivoting with Smart Manufacturing Industry 4.0

Article | January 20, 2022

A smart factory that leverages Industry 4.0 concepts to elevate its operations has long been a model for other industries that are still figuring out how to travel the digital manufacturing route. Smart manufacturing technology is all you need to know if you're looking to cash in on this trend. “Industry 4.0 is not really a revolution. It’s more of an evolution.” – Christian Kubis In this article, we'll look at the advantages that many smart factory pioneers are getting from their smart factories. In addition, we will look at the top smart factory examples and understand how they applied the Industry 4.0 idea and excelled in their smart manufacturing adoption. Industry 4.0 Technology Benefits Manufacturing Industry 4.0 has several benefits that can alter the operations of manufacturers. Beyond optimization and automation, smart manufacturing Industry 4.0 aims to uncover new business prospects and models by increasing the efficiency, speed, and customer focus of manufacturing and associated industries. Key benefits of Manufacturing Industry 4.0 in production include: Improved productivity and efficiency Increased collaboration and knowledge sharing Better agility and adaptability Facilitates compliance Improved customer experience Reduced costs and increased profitability Creates opportunities for innovation Increased revenues World Smart Factory Case Studies and Lessons to Be Learned Schneider Electric, France SAS Schneider Electric's le Vaudreuil plant is a prime example of a smart factory Industry 4.0, having been regarded as one of the most modern manufacturing facilities in the world, utilizing Fourth Industrial Revolution technologies on a large scale. The factory has included cutting-edge digital technology, such as the EcoStruxureTM Augmented Operator Advisor, which enables operators to use augmented reality to accelerate operation and maintenance, resulting in a 2–7% increase in productivity. EcoStruxureTM Resource Advisor's initial deployment saves up to 30% on energy and contributes to long-term improvement. Johnson & Johnson DePuy Synthes, Ireland DePuy Synthes' medical device manufacturing plant, which started in 1997, just underwent a multimillion-dollar makeover to better integrate digitalization and Industry 4.0 smart manufacturing. Johnson & Johnson made a big investment in the Internet of Things. By linking equipment, the factory used IoT technology to create digital representations of physical assets (referred to as “digital twins”). These digital twins resulted in sophisticated machine insights. As a result of these insights, the company was able to reduce operating expenditures while simultaneously reducing machine downtime. Bosch, China Bosch's Wuxi factory's digital transformation uses IIoT and big data. The company integrates its systems to keep track of the whole production process at its facilities. Embedding sensors in production machinery collects data on machine status and cycle time. When data is collected, complicated data analytics tools analyze it in real-time and alert workers to production bottlenecks. This strategy helps forecast equipment failures and allows the organization to arrange maintenance ahead of time. As a consequence, the manufacturer's equipment may run for longer. The Tesla Gigafactory, Germany According to Tesla, the Berlin Gigafactory is the world's most advanced high-volume electric vehicle production plant. On a 300-hectare facility in Grünheide, it produces batteries, powertrains, and cars, starting with the Model Y and Model 3. For Tesla, the goal is not merely to make a smart car, but also to construct a smart factory. The plant's photographs reveal an Industry 4.0 smart factory with solar panels on the roof, resulting in a more sustainable production method. On its official website, Tesla claimed to use cutting-edge casting methods and a highly efficient body shop to improve car safety. Tesla's relentless pursuit of manufacturing efficiency has allowed them to revolutionize the car industry. Haier, China The SmartFactoryKL was established to pave the way for the future's "intelligent factory." It is the world's first manufacturer-independent Industry 4.0 production facility, demonstrating the value of high-quality, flexible manufacturing and the effectiveness with which it can be deployed. The last four years, SmartFactoryKL has been guided by particular strategic objectives that drive innovation; the aim is to see artificial intelligence integrated into production. Two instances of AI-driven transformations include an "order-to-make' mass customization platform and a remote AI-enabled, intelligent service cloud platform that anticipates maintenance needs before they occur. Final Words Enabling smart manufacturing means using the latest technology to improve processes and products. The aforementioned smart factory examples are industry leaders and are thriving by implementing Industry 4.0 technology. Small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) may use these smart factory examples to learn about the adoption process, challenges, and solutions. Industry 4.0 is aimed at improving enterprises and minimizing human effort in general. So adopt the smart factory concept and be productive. FAQ What is the difference between a smart factory and a digital factory? The digital factory enables the planning of factories using virtual reality and models, whereas the smart factory enables the operation and optimization of factories in real time. Where does Industry 4.0 come from? The term "Industry 4.0" was coined in Germany to represent data-driven, AI-powered, networked "smart factories" as the fourth industrial revolution's forerunner.

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IoT in Manufacturing: How It's Changing the Way We Do Business

Article | December 10, 2021

IoT in the manufacturing industry introduces a superior technology that is coming up as a blessing for the industry. Manufacturers are enjoying one-of-a-kind benefits and returns on their reinvestments in IoT. Benefits such as enhanced productivity, work safety, reduced downtime, cost-effective operations, and more such benefits of IoT in manufacturing make it more and more popular with each passing day. The global IoT market is estimated to reach a value of USD 1,386.06 billion by 2026 from USD 761.4 billion in 2020 at a CAGR of 10.53 percent over the forecast period of 2021-2026. So the whole worldwide market of IoT has a bright future in the following years. “As technology takes over and enhances many of the processes we used to handle with manual labor, we are freed up to use our minds creatively, which leads to bigger and better leaps in innovation and productivity.” – Matt Mong, VP Market Innovation and Project Business Evangelist at Adeaca Let’s check out below some exciting facts about IoT in manufacturing and see how IoT makes a difference in the manufacturing industry. IoT in Manufacturing: Some Interesting Facts According to PwC, 91% of industrial/manufacturing enterprises in Germany invest in "digital factories" that use IoT solutions. According to the International Federation of Robotics (IFR), China employs more industrial robots than any other country (many of which are connected to the internet in some way). According to IoT Analytics, the industrial sector spent more than $64 billion on IoT in 2018 and expects investment in Industry 4.0 to reach $310 billion by 2023. According to the Eclipse Foundation, most IoT developers are focused on developing smart agriculture systems (26%), while industrial automation is another big focus area (26%). However, home automation is dwindling in popularity, accounting for just 19% of projects. How Does IoT Work for the Manufacturing Industry? The Internet of Things (IoT) is a network of interconnected devices that communicate with one another and with other networks. While IoT-enabled devices are capable of various tasks, they are primarily employed to collect data and carry out specific tasks. The implementation of the Internet of Things in manufacturing is often referred to as the IIoT, or Industrial Internet of Things. IoT makes use of 'smart' devices to collect, process, and act on data. These intelligent devices are equipped with sensors and other software that enable them to communicate and exchange data inside the network. IoT-enabled equipment gives crucial real-time data that enables manufacturers or machine operators to make informed decisions. So, how does it function in practice? Sensors capture data from the system and transfer it to the cloud, where it can be analyzed. The data is transferred to the quality assurance system. The data that has been analyzed is forwarded to the end-user. How the IoT is Improving Manufacturing Business Operations The Internet of Things (IoT) has numerous benefits for the manufacturing industry. We'll go over some of the significant benefits that the Internet of Things brings to the manufacturing business. Energy Efficiency Solutions Energy is a high cost in manufacturing. Unfortunately, the current industrial energy infrastructure can only track excessive energy consumption. The utility bills include the factory's energy consumption records. But, unfortunately, nobody can break down energy consumption to the device level and find out the underperforming pieces. Some energy usage monitoring tools exist, but they only provide partial data, making system analysis difficult. IoT can help by giving device-level energy data. The sensors will detect any underperforming devices in the network and alert you so you can take action. As a result, the technology can help you reduce energy waste and find other ways to save it. Market Forecasting Data is required to determine trends and quality of production at a manufacturing facility. It also helps manufacturers plan and anticipates changes. These forecasts can help with inventory management, employment, cost control, and other operational procedures. Thus, IoT technology makes it easier to foresee and optimize customer requirements. Proactive Maintenance The Internet of Things (IoT) uses sensors to gather data about assets' health and productivity. In addition, it uses advanced analytics to give actionable information. These are presented on an appealing dashboard connected to your smart device. This allows for predictive maintenance to be used in the manufacturing industry. Superior Product Quality Every manufacturer is determined to produce a high-quality product at a low cost. Therefore, a minor quality modification can have a significant influence on the manufacturing firm. Customer happiness, waste reduction, sales, and profit can all benefit from high-quality products. But making high-quality products isn't easy. The Internet of Things (IoT) can assist you in this endeavor. Poorly set, calibrated, and maintained equipment are some of the main reasons for low-quality products. Worst of all, many small things sometimes go ignored as the final product seems perfect. Quality tests show the product is fine, but your consumers start having problems after a couple of months. Imagine the resources needed to identify and correct the problem. Sensors in an IoT network detect even minimal tweaks in setup and alert operators. The team might momentarily stop production to address the issue before the production cycle gets complete. Rapid and Informed Decision-Making The IoT can dramatically improve organizational decision-making. It unlocks vital data about network equipment performance and delivers it to the right person. Managers and field operators can use this data to improve plant processes and overall production. In addition to these significant benefits, IoT in manufacturing can help manufacturers improve their manufacturing operations and construct a unit that meets the vision of the smart factory of 2040. The future beyond IoT would be the icing on the cake for all of us, as technology has always amazed us. Imagine the day when IoT and AI merge, and the virtual gadgets controlled by IoT are the next major milestone. Then, the ideal combination of robotics, AI, and VR may reduce the manufacturing plant size and cost while increasing the output to a level that is unimaginable and unattainable as of now. Airbus Improved Production Efficiency with Its Factory of the Future Concept It's a massive task for a commercial airliner to be assembled. The expense of making a mistake throughout making such a craft can be significant, as there are millions of parts and thousands of assembly phases. Airbus has established a digital manufacturing effort called Factory of the Future to optimize operations and increase production capacity. The company has installed sensors on factory floor tools and machinery and supplied workers with wearable technologies, such as industrial smart glasses, to reduce errors and improve workplace safety. The wearable allowed for a 500% increase in efficiency while eliminating nearly all mistakes in one process named cabin seat marking. Final Words While the benefits of IoT devices have long been a topic of discussion among technology enthusiasts, the incorporation of IoT in manufacturing is creating a new buzz in the industry. The benefits of IoT in manufacturing, such as remote analysis of operations, processes, and products, are assisting manufacturers in establishing a more productive manufacturing unit. As a result of these benefits, IoT use in manufacturing is accelerating. Recognize the IoT's potential and take a step toward incorporating it into your manufacturing operation in 2022. FAQ What is the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT)? IIoT stands for Industrial Internet of Things. It uses data to improve industrial efficiency. To enhance industrial performance, it uses embedded sensors, cloud data, and connected devices. Why is the IoT changing manufacturing? Real-time monitoring of machines and accurate reporting for better decisions are possible through IoT. This improves business strategies and project control. Thus, the Internet of Things has a significant impact on the profitability of any manufacturing company. How does the IoT transform the way we do business? We can use data collected by IoT devices to improve efficiency and help organizations make better decisions. They tell organizations the truth, not what they hope or believe. { "@context": "https://schema.org", "@type": "FAQPage", "mainEntity": [{ "@type": "Question", "name": "What is the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT)?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "IIoT stands for Industrial Internet of Things. It uses data to improve industrial efficiency. To enhance industrial performance, it uses embedded sensors, cloud data, and connected devices." } },{ "@type": "Question", "name": "Why is the IoT changing manufacturing?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "Real-time monitoring of machines and accurate reporting for better decisions are possible through IoT. This improves business strategies and project control. Thus, the Internet of Things has a significant impact on the profitability of any manufacturing company." } },{ "@type": "Question", "name": "How does the IoT transform the way we do business?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "We can use data collected by IoT devices to improve efficiency and help organizations make better decisions. They tell organizations the truth, not what they hope or believe." } }] }

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The Top Five Lean Manufacturing Tools for 2022

Article | December 13, 2021

Lean manufacturing is a growing trend that aims to reduce waste while increasing productivity in manufacturing systems. But, unfortunately, waste doesn't add value to the product, and buyers don't want to pay for it. This unusual method pushed Toyota Motor Corporation's industry to become a leading Toyota Production System (TPS). As a result, they are now efficiently producing some of the world's top cars with the least waste and the quickest turnaround. The majority of manufacturers are now using lean management. According to the 2010 Compensation Data Manufacturing report, 69.7% of manufacturing businesses use Lean Manufacturing Practices. Lean tools are the ones that help you in implementing lean practice in your organization. These lean tools assist in managing people and change while solving problems and monitoring performance. Lean Manufacturing technologies are designed to reduce waste, improve flow, improve quality control, and maximize manufacturing resources. What Are the Five Best Lean Manufacturing Tools and How Do They Work? There are roughly 50 Lean Manufacturing tools available in the market. This post will describe 5 of them and their value to your business and its developments. 5S The 5S system promotes efficiency by organizing and cleaning the workplace. To help increase workplace productivity, the system has five basic guidelines (five S's). The five Ss are Sort, Set, Shine, Standardize, and Sustain. 5S improves workplace efficiency and effectiveness by: Sort: Removing unnecessary material from each work area Set: Set the goal of creating efficient work areas for each individual Shine: Maintaining a clean work area after each shift helps identify and resolve minor concerns Standardize: Documenting changes to make other work areas' applications more accessible Sustain: Repeat each stage for continuous improvement 5S is a lean tool used in manufacturing, software, and healthcare. Kaizen and Kanban can be utilized to produce the most efficient workplace possible. Just-In-Time (JIT) manufacturing Just-in-time manufacturing allows manufacturers to produce products only after a customer requests them. This reduces the risk of overstocking or damaging components or products during storage. Consider JIT if your company can operate on-demand and limit the risk of only carrying inventory as needed. JIT can help manage inventory, but it can also hinder meeting customer demand if the supply chain breaks. Kaizen With Kaizen, you may enhance seven separate areas at once: business culture, leadership, procedures, quality, and safety. Kaizen is a Japanese word, means "improvement for the better" or "constant improvement." “Many companies are not willing to change or think they are done once they make a change. But the truth is technology; consumer demands, the way we work, human needs and much more are constantly changing.” – Michael Walton, Director, Industry Executive at Microsoft The idea behind Kaizen is that everyone in the organization can contribute suggestions for process improvement. Accepting everyone's viewpoints may not result in significant organizational changes, but minor improvements here and there will add up over time to substantial reductions in wasted resources. Kanban Kanban is a visual production method that delivers parts to the production line as needed. This lean tool works by ensuring workers get what they need when they need it. Previously, employees used Kanban cards to request new components, and new parts were not provided until the card asked them to. In recent years, sophisticated software has replaced Kanban cards to signal demand electronically. Using scanned barcodes to signify when new components are needed, the system may automatically request new parts. Kanban allows businesses to manage inventory better, decrease unnecessary stock, and focus on the products that must be stored. To reduce waste and improve efficiency, facilities can react to current needs rather than predict the future. Kanban encourages teams and individuals to improve Kanban solutions and overall production processes like Kaizen. Kanban as a lean tool can be used with Kaizen and 5S. PDCA (Plan, Do, Check, Act) Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA) is a scientific strategy for managing change. Dr. W. Edwards Deming invented it in the 1950s; hence, it is called the ‘Deming Cycle.’ The PDCA cycle has four steps: Problem or Opportunity: Determine whether a problem or an opportunity exists Do: Make a small test Examine: Look over the test results Act: Take action depending on results How Nestlé Used the Kaizen Lean Manufacturing Tool Nestlé is the largest food corporation in the world, yet it is also a company that practices Lean principles, particularly the Kaizen method. Nestlé Waters used a technique known as value stream mapping, which is frequently associated with Kaizen. They designed a new bottling factory from scratch to guarantee that operations were as efficient as possible. Nestlé has been aiming to make ongoing changes to their processes to reduce waste and the amount of time and materials that can be wasted during their operations. Final Words Lean manufacturing techniques enable many businesses to solve their manufacturing difficulties and become more productive and customer-centric. In addition, useful lean manufacturing tools assist companies in obtaining the anticipated outcomes and arranging their operations in many excellent ways to meet buyer expectations. Hence, gather a list of the top lean manufacturing tools and choose the best fit for your organization to maximize your ROI and address the performance issue that is causing your outcomes to lag. FAQ What are the standard tools in lean manufacturing? Among the more than 50 lean manufacturing tools, Kaizen, 5S, Kanban, Value Stream Mapping, and PDCA are the most commonly used lean manufacturing tools. How to Select the Best Lean Manufacturing Tools for Your Business? Choosing a lean manufacturing tool begins with identifying the issue or lag in your organization that affects overall productivity and work quality. To select the lean device that best meets your company's needs, you must first grasp each one's benefits and implementation techniques. What is included in a Lean 5S toolkit? The lean 5S toolbox contains some essential items for achieving the goal. It comes with a notepad or tablet, a camera, a high-quality flashlight, a tape measure, and a stopwatch. { "@context": "https://schema.org", "@type": "FAQPage", "mainEntity": [{ "@type": "Question", "name": "What are the standard tools in lean manufacturing?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "Among the more than 50 lean manufacturing tools, Kaizen, 5S, Kanban, Value Stream Mapping, and PDCA are the most commonly used lean manufacturing tools." } },{ "@type": "Question", "name": "How to Select the Best Lean Manufacturing Tools for Your Business?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "Choosing a lean manufacturing tool begins with identifying the issue or lag in your organization that affects overall productivity and work quality. 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Spotlight

Nedschroef

Nedschroef is a leading engineering and manufacturing partner in forming technologies with over 125 years of experience. Our worldwide activities vary from design and prototyping to trading, production and logistics, to help our customers fulfil their current and future needs. Our capabilities allow us to work with both established and new companies of any size in manufacturing industries including automotive, racing, aviation and construction.

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